Clean Water, Good Health

Nearly 900 million people do not have access to safe water sources and approximately 2.5 billion - 39 percent of the world’s population - do not have adequate sanitation services. As a result, 1.8 million people die every year from diarrheal diseases. Ninety-percent of these deaths are children under five ... continue reading.

Developing Local Capacity in Kenya

International Medical Corps operates in emergency relief settings, in conflict and post-conflict environments, and in more stable conditions where the task is supporting longer-term development, such as the remote and arid Samburu district in northern Kenya. Water is so scarce in this area that local residents limit themselves to about ... continue reading.

Ending Gender-Based Violence

Violence against women is a pervasive public health and human rights problem affecting both the physical and mental health of women and girls worldwide. International Medical Corps (IMC) integrates innovative strategies into its programs to address the problem of gender-based violence, or GBV. In post-conflict settings, IMC teams conduct intensive ... continue reading.

Ending Violence Against Women

Violence against women is a pervasive public health and human rights problem affecting both the physical and mental health of women and girls worldwide. International Medical Corps (IMC) integrates innovative strategies into its programs to address the problem of gender-based violence, or GBV. IMC works both in areas of armed ... continue reading.

Helping Survivors of Violence

International Medical Corps (IMC) has operated in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) since 1999, a region plagued with some of the highest GBV (gender-based violence) rates in the world. IMC provides emergency health care and a range of support services to vulnerable communities. They offer confidential physical exams and initial ... continue reading.

Improving Infrastructure in War-Torn Iraq

International Medical Corps (IMC) works with local Iraqi government authorities to restore derelict urban water and sanitation systems. In Ramadi, they restored both a water treatment plant and distribution system that had been operating at about 10% of capacity. More than half the 100,000 local residents who depended on the ... continue reading.

Mental Health in Disaster

As one of the very few international relief organizations to make mental health care a priority, International Medical Corps has the capacity to address the immediate psychosocial needs of communities struck by disaster as well as identify and treat those with pre-existing mental health disorders. In emergencies, the problem is ... continue reading.

Saving Women's Health

In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), where years of conflict have destroyed health infrastructure, an alarmingly high number of females suffer from fistulas, a severe gynecologic rupture caused by inadequate medical care for pregnant women, as well as by rampant sexual violence being used as a weapon of war. ... continue reading.

Saving Women, Saving Lives

International Medical Corps’ goal is to provide quality health care to those in need, bringing new hope to individuals and strengthening underserved communities worldwide. Because 80-percent of those affected by war, conflict, and natural disaster are women and children, International Medical Corps prioritizes maternal and child health in its emergency ... continue reading.

Worldwide Emergency Response

Over the past 27 years, International Medical Corps has responded to more than 65 countries on four continents, earning the reputation as a fast, reliable first responder. Their emergency response teams have the ability to bring emergency health care, nutrition, water and sanitation, and other vital health services to those ... continue reading.